Withdrawal from RE & CAW

All parents have the right to withdraw their child from Religious Education lessons and Assemblies. Teachers have the right not to teach RE.

Checklist for schools (from: Religious Education in English schools: Non‑Statutory Guidance 2010)
Question 1: Is the school careful to ensure that RE is of educational value to all pupils, whatever their belief background, thus reducing the likelihood of parental/carer requests for withdrawal?
Answer 1: The school adheres to Suffolk County Council's Agreed Syllabus (see attached) which is produced by the Standing Advisory Council on Religious Education (SACRE).

Question 2: Does the school ensure that the nature, objectives and content of RE are shared with parents?
Answer 2: The Agreed Syllabus details the nature, objective and content of RE lessons. These are adhered to within RE lessons.

Question 3: Are parents or carers notified about plans for RE as part of the curriculum for the coming session for their child’s class?
Answer 3: Parents may request to see the planning overview for RE each term and use this to choose which lessons they wish to to withdraw their child from.

Question 4: Does the school have a procedure in place for parents or carers who want to withdraw children from RE?
Answer 4: Attached to this web page is a Withdrawal Form that parents can complete and return to the school.

Question 5: Does the organisation of the curriculum allow parents to exercise the right of withdrawal?
Answer 5: Please see answers 3 and 4 above.

Question 6: What practical implications arise from a request by parents to withdraw a child from RE and how might they be addressed?
Answer 6: If a child is withdrawn from RE, the main issue for the school is what the child does whilst their classmates are in an RE lesson or assembly.  If pupils are withdrawn from RE, schools have a duty to supervise them, although not to provide additional teaching or to incur extra cost. Pupils will usually remain on school premises. If a child is withdrawn from assemblies, then the child may be supervised by a member of staff in their classroom, or with a group of withdrawn children in another classroom, or may be required to sit outside the school office or in the library where they can be supervised. If a child is withdrawn from a whole RE lesson, they will be placed with another class who are not being taught RE. In this case, they may join in with the lesson that class is undertaking or may be set a task by their class teacher. At some points in the year, for example Christmas, Easter, celebrations with a religious context may take over a considerable part of the timetable. In these instances, the headteacher may grant leave of absence for a child to be educated at home. Parents should request such leave using the school's Absence Request form.

Where a pupil has been withdrawn, the law provides for alternative arrangements to be made for RE of the kind the parent wants the pupil to receive. This RE could be provided at the school in question, or the pupil could be sent to another school where suitable RE is provided if this is reasonably convenient. If neither approach is practicable, outside arrangements can be made to provide the pupil with the kind of RE that the parent wants, and the pupil may be withdrawn from school for a reasonable period of time to allow them to attend this external RE.


Outside arrangements for RE are allowed as long as the LA is satisfied that any interference with the pupil’s attendance at school resulting from the withdrawal will affect only the start or end of a school session.

The aforementioned options need to be discussed with the headteacher on a individual basis.

Question 7: Are all those who teach RE aware of the school’s procedures?
Answer 7: This information has been shared with staff who teach RE, class teachers and senior staff.

 
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Wendy James,
12 Jul 2014, 08:52
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Wendy James,
12 Jul 2014, 08:52
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Wendy James,
12 Jul 2014, 09:54
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Wendy James,
12 Jul 2014, 08:56